Please note I have a new phone number...

512-517-2708

Alan Maki

Alan Maki
Doing research at the LBJ Library in Austin, Texas

It's time to claim our Peace Dividend

It's time to claim our Peace Dividend

We need to beat swords into plowshares.

We need to beat swords into plowshares.

A program for real change...

http://peaceandsocialjustice.blogspot.com/2013/03/a-progressive-program-for-real-change.html


What we need is a "21st Century Full Employment Act for Peace and Prosperity" which would make it a mandatory requirement that the president and Congress attain and maintain full employment.


"Voting is easy and marginally useful, but it is a poor substitute for democracy, which requires direct action by concerned citizens"

- Ben Franklin

Let's talk...

Let's talk...

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

First Nations go on offensive in Canada; will lobby foreign embassies for help in ending racism

Ottawa Embassies to be lobbiedFebruary 24th, 2012

A group of indigenous people will travel to Ottawa to visit 120 Embassies located in the nation’s capital. For four days in mid March, indigenous people will be in Ottawa visiting 30 Embassies per day with information on violations of indigenous human rights. Former Chief Terrance Nelson of Roseau River Anishinabe First Nation is one of the main organizers along with Dakota Chief Frank Brown and they have support from some Mohawks, 

“We will carry over 200 packages of information, targeting the Canadian Indian Act, Housing, the over 600 Murdered and Missing Women, the theft of our children under CFS, but the big issue is getting international action on a share of our own wealth, the Natural Resources which has been stolen from the indigenous peoples of these lands”.

“No one should dismiss us, in the National Day of Action four years ago, we warned that a confrontation between indigenous peoples and the government would have dire economic consequences for all of Canada.” 
A caravan of seven vehicles will start out from Winnipeg on Friday March 9
th, stopping three nights in various First Nation communities along the way before reaching Ottawa on Monday March 12th 2012. 

At ten a.m. on Tuesday March 13
th 2012, the group intends to demonstrate outside the Iranian Embassy and as stated in Nelson’s letter to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the group will deliver a package of detailed information requesting specific help from the Iranians. In the following three days, demonstrations will take place at the Chinese Embassy, the German Embassy and on Friday, the American Embassy, 30 Embassies in total will be visited each of the four days.

For Further information 
Contact Terrance Nelson 204-451-0740

-30-

* * * * 

To      All Chiefs and Councils
        First Nation people

February 28
th 2012

Re: Lobbying the Embassies in Ottawa
Please find attached the letter I wrote to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran and the list of embassies we will visit March 13 to 16, 2012, in Ottawa. This will cost us around $50,000 to carry out because we are driving out to Ottawa starting March 9
th from Winnipeg. 

On Friday March 9
th, we will at the Manitoba Legislature from 11 a.m. to Noon, for a rally. Come out and see what we plan to deliver to the Embassies. If nothing else, hear from the people who are going to Ottawa. We are deliberately avoiding going to the government of Canada, they already have as much studies and documents from us to do something about the problems. They don’t need more paper from us. 

We need access to foreign banks for mortgages and investment for business development. We have a chance to get something done, we are going to get access to OPEC nations. Mohawks are going to put in half the costs of this event but if the documents on First Nations isn’t done right, or the banners etc aren’t done right, we lose a chance of making the impact we need. Just the Child Welfare issue alone is reason to make this trip. Ten thousand children in care in Manitoba, the Residential School era is happening right now and some of those children in care today will become a statistic of the murdered and missing women of the future.

There is no money to be made in activism; we are not doing this for money. We are doing this to change the system that we have lived under for so long. If we are doing it for the kids like we always heard from the speeches given at the meetings, why would we be so scared to go to an embassy? If you are tired of being ignored in Canada, why not send a document on your situation with us?

Terrance Nelson
204-451-840,              terrancenelson74@gmail.com
* * * * *

His Excellency Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
President of the Islamic Republic of Iran               
C/O Embassy of I.R. of Iran                                Telephone # 613-235-4726
245 Metcalfe St. Ottawa, Ontario,                         Fax #            613-232-5712
Canada   K2P 2K2                                                     
executive@iranembassy.ca
February 23rd 2012

Mr. Terrance Nelson
Box 346
Letellier, Manitoba, 
Canada R0G-1C0

Your Excellency!

Re: Indigenous Peoples of Canada
 I wish to thank the Iranian people for their continued interest and support for the indigenous peoples of North America. When I wrote the book “Genocide in Canada” (1997), the Iranian Embassy in Ottawa requested more copies. Iranian interest in First Nations in Canada has been longstanding. Years ago, eight of us indigenous people demonstrated in front of the Iranian Embassy. Sixteen police cars, including Ontario Provincial Police, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Secret Service and Ottawa city police did not allow us to deliver our information. We will attend to your Ottawa embassy on March 13, 2012 to try again.

Ramin Mehmanparast, (Iranian Foreign Ministry) responded February 15
th 2012 to Canadian Foreign Minister Baird’s comments on Human Rights in Iran by referring to the appalling conditions of indigenous people in Canada. Mehmanparast urged indigenous peoples to take Canada to international forums for meaningful remedies. We are taking his advice. 

As an indigenous person and a former Chief of my community, I take the position that economic sanctions against Iran is genocide. I support the right of the Iranian people to defend themselves against undue aggression and financial extortion. 

Canada currently sends 2.5 million barrels of oil per day to the United States. Twenty miles from my home community of Roseau River, Enbridge operates a pipeline depot that pumps over a million barrels of oil a day to the United States. Canada has not fulfilled its legal obligations pursuant to Treaty with our people and endangers its right of access to our Treaty historical lands including the lands upon which the pumping depot sits.
Canada has purchased over 2 trillion dollars of American exports in the last ten years. For 22 years I have been trying to get the United States to pressure Canada into rectifying the dismal human rights record that has devastated the indigenous peoples of Canada. Iran has already highlighted the human rights record in Canada, while the United States government continues to remain silent.

Officially, the United States government sees the issues facing indigenous peoples in Canada as an internal domestic matter. The sixty different metals and minerals mined in Canada benefits the American economy but not the indigenous people in Canada. Unlike the American Bill of Rights, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms contains no Right to Property. Canadian politicians feared“Americanizing” the Canadian Court system and thus excluded the right to property to ensure that indigenous people could not use the courts to uphold their rightful ownership of all the natural resource wealth.

Originally, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and United States voted against the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement, there is security of energy exports for the United States, but NAFTA does not recognize the rights of indigenous people in Canada to property or payment for natural resources extraction. 
Canada has consistently been in the top level of the United Nations Living Index while indigenous peoples in Canada are at the 72
nd level of that same index. At one point, for seven straight years, Canada was ranked first place in the United Nations assessment as the “best country in the world to live in”.

British legislation, the Indian Act, first enacted in 1876, is today not simply a violation of human rights but creates living conditions that fits the 1948 United Nation’s Genocide Act.


Genocide is defined under article II of the 1948 United Nations Genocide Act as:

a.      Killing members of the group;
b.      Causing serious bodily or mental harm to the members of the group;
c.      Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
d.      Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
e.      Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
The Indian Act is archaic colonial legislation. The act creates a system of undeclared economic sanctions that remain in effect 136 years later. In a book written in 1963 by W.H. Jennings on Canadian Business Law, the impact of Section 89 of the Indian Act is explained in law as;

IndiansWhen living on a government reservation, an Indian is a ward of the Crown and is protected in the following manner;

1)      He is not legally bound in a contract-not even for necessaries.
2)      As in the case of a minor, such Indian may hold the other party to the contract.
3)      No contract to dispose of or to place a mortgage against the property of an Indian is binding.
4)      All personal property of an Indian is free from seizure for debt, but the unpaid seller may take security on any article purchased for any part of the price which is unpaid.
Jennings goes on to define Indians living on a government reservation as
OTHER PARTIES HAVING LIMITED POWERS
In addition to minors, insane persons, intoxicated persons and Indians, two other classes have limited power to contract.
They are:
1)      Limited companies
2)      Alien enemies
Restricting indigenous people’s access to banking institutions has caused indigenous communities to have as high as 95% unemployment. Mortgages for individuals living on a reservation areunavailable except by express written permission of the Minister of Indian Affairs. Under Canadian law, reservation lands are not owned by indigenous people, they are lands held in trust by the Government for Indians. Section 89 of the Indian Act, deems all “Indians” living on a government reservation legally incompetent. 

According to the World Economic Forum, Geneva, survey of 133 countries, Canada has the strongest banking system in the world, ranked first in the world. We as indigenous people living on a reservation, however, are denied access to Canada’s banking system. The Indian Act ensures that all indigenous adults living on reserve are legally in the same category as children and alien enemies. The Indian Act has created economically devastated indigenous communities. 

As a result of the undeclared economic sanctions enforced by Canadian law, there are now over 600 murdered and missing indigenous women in Canada. Over 10,000 indigenous children in the province of Manitoba are in foster care. United Nation defines Genocide as Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. This same system happened previously in the Residential School era where over 125,000 children were taken deliberately from their homes on reserve.  They were forcefully indoctrinated into non indigenous belief systems. 
The current system that restricts individuals from acquiring personal mortgages and therefore personal ownership of homes on reserve becomes an excuse to house indigenous children in the homes of immigrants, immigrants who don’t face the same restrictions as indigenous people.

The Assembly of First Nations, the national indigenous political organization in Canada has concluded that 80,000 new houses are required in our 633 reservations. Canada has set aside $400 million per year to finance the public housing needs of First Nations. At a minimum cost of $150,000 per new house in northern Canada, it will require $120 billion to finance First Nation housing needs. Denying indigenous people individual mortgages and access to banks means it will take 300 years for Canada to finance our current housing shortage.

In order to break the system of undeclared economic sanctions against our people, we must look to other nations who are willing to give us access to their banks and financial institutions. We are the real owners of all the natural resource wealth in Canada but we are denied a share of our property. We need other nations to condemn the theft of our lands and resources. We should be the wealthiest people in the world if we had even a small share of our own natural resource wealth. 

United States and western nations have declared economic sanctions against Iran and perhaps even an all out war against the Iranian people. Economic sanctions are however a double edged sword now that the United States is in such deep financial crisis. In the 2007 National Day of Action we warned Canada that a confrontation between indigenous people and the immigrants would have dire financial implications not just for Canada but also the United States. This is even more so following the economic meltdown in 2008. 

I accepted an invitation from the Saddam Hussein Government in April 1998 to visit their country and see the effects of economic sanctions. I organized a fact finding mission with 7 indigenous people from Canada. During our 11 day visit, we took 25 hours of video footage. The Iraqi dinar which was worth 3 and half American dollars prior to 1990 faced hyper inflation under economic sanctions and in 1998, it took 1,450 Iraqi dinars to buy one American dollar. 

The United Nations concluded in December 1995, that 567,000 Iraqi children had died in the first five years of economic sanctions. To my knowledge no nation has ever raised the issue of the U.S. military using depleted uranium against targets in Iraq. A four-fold rise in cancer in Iraqi people after 1990 is documented. How the military use of depleted uranium was authorized within American law remains an outstanding question. Will Iran’s nuclear sites be bombed with the same impunity?

I live within sixty minutes ride from one of the largest concentrations of nuclear weapons in the world. I do not support the use or proliferation of more nuclear weapons but I believe all people have a right to defend themselves against aggression. There are over 22,000 active nuclear warheads in the world. Weapons of mass destruction is of concern for all people in the world and we have every right to voice our concerns even against our own military. 

The American people have a right to question their government and their military. The “Occupy Movement” in the United States is similar to the movement against the Vietnam War. The average American is held hostage to $4 a gallon for gasoline and are questioning their government. Many Americans question any declaration of war against Iran. The internet has given people an ability to look beyond stereotyping by western media. There are people in North America who are willing to listen to the Iranian position. 

I remember clearly in the 70s that students from Iran came to the United States trying to protest the violations of Human Rights under the Shah. The United States government took no action against the Shah. When our rights are ignored or violated, we all have a right to take action.

I seek an opportunity to present information to the Iranian people. Specifically I ask for your help to break the undeclared economic sanctions that have devastated our First Nations in Canada. We understand that because of the economic sanctions Canada will never allow us to have financial support from your government. 

Despite 22 years of trying to get the United States government to respond to the violations of indigenous human rights in Canada, going outside of American sphere of influence will have consequences for us. 

We seek your government’s support to help us open the doors to OPEC nations that may be willing to do business with the indigenous people of Canada. We have lands that if developed can provide food security for OPEC nations. We can do business that is mutually beneficial. We ask that the OPEC nations help us to acquire a share of our own natural resource wealth. Like the OPEC nations, if we can finally get a share of our own natural resource wealth, we will be able to support ourselves. Until that day comes, we need your help.

Dakota people and our group will be demonstrating in front of your Iranian Embassy in Ottawa mid March and it is not a protest against Iran, it is a call for help. I will personally deliver a package of information to your Embassy that will be much more detailed and specific. I believe that this package of information can be sent by Diplomatic Pouch to your attention.

I wish to thank you once again for the people of Iran who are interested and supportive of our fight for human rights in Canada. In my Ojibway language, I say Mii-gwetch, (Thank You) for your attention to this letter and attachments.

Sincerely

Terrance Nelson
204-451-0740
Email 
terrancenelson74@gmail.com



‘Canada’s remarks on Iranian nuclear program laughable’ TEHRAN, Feb. 15 (MNA) – Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Ramin Mehmanparast said on Wednesday that Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird’s recent remarks about Tehran’s nuclear program are not worth responding to.
 
Baird, in an interview with the Jerusalem Post in early February, said, “What we know is that this (Iran) is a regime that is enriching uranium and that has a clear nuclear arms program underway. That is undisputable.”
Mehmanparast said, “Those remarks do not meet the lowest diplomatic standards, so they are not worth responding to.”
“Mr. Baird should fully clarify why he strongly made the laughable claim that Iran is producing nuclear weapons while the International Atomic Energy Agency has officially announced dozens of times that Iran’s nuclear program is under the full supervision of this international body and no evidence of diversion has ever been found,” he added.
In response to Baird’s comments on the human rights situation in Iran, in which he had said that the Islamic Republic has a “disgraceful human rights record,” Mehmanparast advised the Canadian government to make efforts to improve the appalling conditions that the indigenous people of Canada are experiencing.



Day One Tuesday March 13th 2012

Iranian Embassy

245 Metcalfe St. Ottawa

Drum Group Begins Singing at 10 A.M. and the Demonstration and speeches ends at 11:30 A.M.

Speakers, Terrance Nelson, Chief Frank Brown, Ernest Cobiness, others TBA

Breaking the Undeclared Economic Sanctions against Indigenous peoples in Canada

11 am, five individuals approach the Embassy to deliver information

Noon

Eight groups will deliver packages of information to the following Embassies, all at the same time


1.        Group one               Afghanistan C/O Pakistan, Burnside Building, 151 Slater St. Ste. 608
2.        Group two,             Embassy of the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria, 435 Daly Ave,
3.        Group three,           Embassy of Argentina Republic, RBC Center, 90 Sparks Street, Ste. 910
4.        Group four,             High Commission of Republic of Bangladesh,  275 Bank St, Ste 302
5.        Group five,             Belarus Embassy, 285 Charlotte St,
6.        Group six,               Republic of Brazil, 450 Wilbord St,
7.        Group seven,          Embassy of the Republic of Colombia, 360 Albert Street, Ste 1002
8.        Group eight,            High Commission for the Republic of Cameroon, 170 Clemow Ave,
9.        Group one,              Antiqua and Barbuda, 112 Kent St. Ste. 1610, Place de Ville, Tower B,
10.     Group two,             Republic of Armenia, 130 Albert St. Ste 1006,     


Two P.M.

1.        Group one,              Republic of Bolivia  130 Albert St. Ste 504
2.        Group two,             Embassy of the Republic of Ivory Coast 9 Marlborough Ave,
3.        Group three,           Embassy of the Kingdom of Denmark, 47 Clarence St. Ste 450
4.        Group four,             Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt, 454 Laurier Ave E,
5.        Group five,             Republic of Ghana, 1 Clemow Ave
6.        Group six,               Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 151 Slater St. Ste 210,
7.       Group seven,           Embassy of the Republic of Hungary, 299 Waverly St.
8.                                                       Group eight,            Embassy of Ireland, 130 Albert St. Ste 1105,
9.                                                       Group three,            Embassy of the Republic of Austria, 445 Wilbrod St.
10.                                                    Group four,             Commonwealth of the Bahamas, 360 Albert St. Ste. 1020,

Four P.M.

1.                                                           Group one            Embassy of the State of Kuwait, 80 Elgin St.
2.                                                           Group two,           Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, 249 McLeod St,
3.        Group three,             Australian High Commission, 50 O'Connor St. Ste 710,
4.                                                           Group four,          Embassy of the Italian Republic, 275 Slater St. 21st Floor,
5.                                                           Group five,           Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Burnside Bldg. 151 Slater St. Ste 608
6.                                                           Group six,             Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia, 99 Bank St. Ste 901,
7.                                                           Group seven,        Embassy of the Republic of Senegal, 57 Marlborough Ave.
8.                                                           Group eight,         The Royal Thai Embassy, 180 Island Park Dr.
9.                                                           Group five,           High Commission for Barbados, 130 Albert St, Ste 600,



 

Day Two, Wednesday March 14th 2012

People's Republic of China Embassy
515 St. Patrick St,

Drum Group Begins Singing at 10 A.M. and the Demonstration and speeches ends at 11:30 A.M.

Speakers, Terrance Nelson, Speakers TBA

Gateway Pipeline, Indigenous People’s Property Rights, Trade, WMDs

11 a.m. five individuals approach the Embassy to deliver information

Noon

Eight groups will deliver packages of information to the following Embassies, all at the same time


1.        Group one               Kingdom of Belgium 80 Elgin Street, 4th Floor,
2.        Group two,             Republic of Benin 58 Glebe Ave,
3.        Group three,           High Commission for Brunei Les Suites Hotel, Room 2207, 130 Besserer St,
4.        Group four,             Republic of Bulgaria, 325 Stewart St,
5.        Group five,             Embassy of Burkina, Faso, 48 Range Rd,
6.        Group six,               Republic of Burundi, 50 Kaymar St. Rothwell Heights, Gloucester,
7.        Group seven,          Cayman Islands c/o British High Commission, 80 Elgin St,
8.        Group eight,            Embassy of the Republic of Costa Rica, 135 York Street, Ste 208
9.        Group six,               Embassy of the Republic of Croatia, 130 Albert Street, Ste 1700,
10.     Group seven,          Embassy of the Republic of Cuba, 388 Main Street,
               


Two P.M.

1.        Group one,              Embassy of the Czech Republic, 541 Sussex Dr.
2.        Group two,             Representative of Dominica, 112 Kent St, Ste. 1610, Place de Ville, Tower B,
3.        Group three,           Embassy of the Republic of Ecuador, O'Connor St, Ste 1311
4.        Group four,             Embassy of the Republic of El Salvador, 209 Kent St, Ste 504,
5.        Group five,             Embassy of Equatorial Guinea, C/O 4 Range Road,
6.        Group six,               Embassy of Finland, 55 Metcalfe St. Ste 850,
7.        Group seven,          Embassy of France, 42 Sussex Drive,    
8.        Group eight,            Embassy of Gabonese Republic, 4 Range Road
9.        Group eight,            Embassy of the Hellenic Republic,  76-80 MacLaren St.
10.     Group one,              Embassy of Greenland c/o Royal Danish Embassy, 47 Clarence St. Ste 450,      

Four P.M.

1.                                                           Group one,           Embassy of Grenada, 112 Kent St. Ste 1610, Place de Ville, Tower B
2.                                                           Group two,           Embassy of the Republic of Guatemala, 130 Albert St. Ste 1010,        
3.                                                           Group three,         Embassy of the Republic of Guinea, 483 Wilbrod St,
4.                                                           Group four,          Republic of Guyana, Burnside Bldg. 151 Slater St. Ste 309,
5.                                                           Group five,           Republic of Haiti, 112 Kent St. Ste 205, Place de Ville Tower B         
6.                                                           Group six,             Embassy of the Republic of Honduras, 151 Slater St. Ste 908,
7.                                                           Group seven,        Republic of India, 10 Springfield Rd.    
8.                                                           Group eight,         Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia, 287 MacLaren St,   
9.                                                           Group two,           Embassy of the Republic of Iraq, 215 McLeod St.               

Day Three Thursday March 15th 2012

Federal Republic of Germany Embassy
1 Waverly St.


Drum Group Begins Singing at 10 A.M. and the Demonstration and speeches ends at 11:30 A.M.

Speakers to be announced TBA

Over Six Hundred Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in Canada

11 am, five individuals approach the Embassy to deliver information

Noon

Eight groups will deliver packages of information to the following Embassies, all at the same time


1.        Group one,              Embassy of Israel, 50 O'Connor St. Ste 1005,      
2.        Group two,             Jamaican High Commission, 275 Slater St. Ste 800,
3.        Group three,           Embassy of Japan, 255 Sussex Dr. Ottawa
4.        Group four,             Embassy of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, 100 Bronson Ave. Ste 701,
5.        Group five,             High Commission for the Republic of Kenya, 415 Laurier Ave E,
6.        Group six,               Embassy of the Republic of Korea (south), 151 Slater St. Floor 5,
7.        Group seven,          Republic of Latvia, 112 Kent St. Ste 208, Place de Ville Tower B
8.        Group eight,            Embassy of the Lebanese Republic, 640 Lyon St S,
9.        Group three,           High Commission for the Kingdom of Lesotho, 202 Clemow Ave.
10.     Group four,             Embassy of the Republic of Madagascar, 282 Somerset St W              


Two P.M.

1.        Group one,              High Commission of the Republic of Malawi, 7 Clemow Ave.
2.        Group two,             High Commission for Malaysia, 60 Boteler St,
3.        Group three,           Embassy, Maldives, High Commission for Sri Lanka 333 Laurier Ave W, Ste 1204,
4.        Group four,             Embassy of the Republic of Mali, 50 Goulburn Ave.
5.        Group five,             Embassy of the United Mexican States, 45 O'Connor St, Ste 1500,
6.        Group six,               Representative for Montserrat, 112 Kent St, Ste. 1610, Place de Ville, Tower B,
7.        Group seven,          Embassy of the Union of Myanmar, 85 Range Rd, Ste 902,
8.        Group eight,            Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, 350 Albert St. Ste 2020,
9.        Group five,             New Zealand High Commission, Metropolitan House, 90 Bank St. Ste 727,
10.     Group six,               Embassy of the Republic of Nicaragua, 130 Albert St. Ste 407,

Four P.M.

1.                                                           Group one            Embassy of the Republic of Niger, 38 Blackburn Ave,
2.                                                           Group two,           Embassy of the Kingdom of Norway, RBC Center, 90 Sparks St. Ste 532,
3.                                                           Group three,         Embassy of the Republic of Panama, 130 Albert St. Ste 300
4.                                                           Group four,          Embassy of the Republic of Paraguay, 151 Slater St. Ste 401,
5.                                                           Group five,           Embassy of the Republic of Peru, 130 Albert St. Ste 1901,
6.                                                           Group six,             Embassy of the Republic of Philippines, 130 Albert St. Ste 606-608,
7.                                                           Group seven,        Embassy of the Republic of Poland, 443 Daly Ave.
8.                                                           Group eight,         Embassy of Romania, 655 Rideau St.
9.                                                           Group seven,        Embassy of Russian Federation, 285 Charlotte St.

Day Four, Friday March 16th 2012


Embassy of the United States of America
100 Wellington St.


Drum Group Begins Singing at 10 A.M. and the Demonstration and speeches ends at 11:30 A.M.

Speakers to be announced TBA

Tar Sands, North American Free Trade Agreement, Dakota People

11 am, five individuals approach the Embassy to deliver information

Noon

Eight groups will deliver packages of information to the following Embassies, all at the same time


1.        Group one               Embassy of Portugal, 645 Island Park Dr.
2.        Group two,             Embassy of the Rwandese Republic, 121 Sherwood Dr.
3.        Group three,           Embassy of Saint Kitts and Nevis, 112 Kent St. Ste 1610, Place de Ville Tower B
4.        Group four,             Embassy of Saint Lucia, 112 Kent St. Ste 1610, Place de Ville Tower B,
5.        Group five,             Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, 112 Kent St. Ste 1610, Place de Ville Tower B,
6.                                                           Group six,               Embassy of Serbia and Montenegro, 17 Blackburn Ave.
7.        Group seven,          Embassy of Slovak Republic, 50 Rideau Terrace,
8.        Group eight,            Embassy of the Republic of Slovenia, 150 Metcalfe St. Ste 2101,
9.        Group eight,            Embassy of the Republic of South Africa, 15 Sussex Dr.
10.     Group one,              Embassy of the Kingdom of Spain, 350 Sparks St. Ste 802,


Two P.M.

1.        Group one,              Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, 333 Laurier Ave W, Ste 1204,
2.        Group two,             Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan, 85 Range Rd. Ste 507-510,
3.        Group three,           High Commission for the Kingdom of Swaziland, 130 Albert St. Ste 1204,
4.        Group four,             Embassy of Sweden, Mercury Court, 377 Dalhousie St.
5.        Group five,             Embassy of Switzerland, 5 Marlborough Ave,
6.        Group six,               High Commission for the Republic of Tanzania, 50 Range Rd.
7.        Group seven,          Embassy of the Republic of Togo, 12 Range Rd.
8.        Group eight,            Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, 75 Albert St. Ste 508,
9.        Group two,             Embassy of the Republic of Tunisia, 515 O'Connor St.
10.     Group three,           Embassy of the Republic of Turkey, 197 Wurtemburg St.

Four P.M.


1.                                                           Group one            Vatican Embassy, The Apostolic Nunciature, 724 Manor Ave. Rockcliffe Park,
2.                                                           Group two,           High Commission for the Republic of Uganda, 231 Cobourg St,
3.                                                           Group three,         Embassy of Ukraine, 310 Somerset St. W,
4.                                                           Group four,          British High Commission, 80 Elgin St,
5.                                                           Group five,           Embassy of the Eastern Republic of Uruguay, 130 Albert St. Ste 1905,
6.                                                           Group six,             Embassy of Socialist Republic of Vietnam, 266 MacLaren St.
7.                                                           Group seven,        Embassy of the Republic of Yemen, 350 Sparks St. Ste 1100,
8.                                                           Group eight,         Embassy of the Republic of Zaire, 18 Range Rd.
9.                                                           Group four,          High Commission for the Republic of Zimbabwe, 332 Somerset St W,